MANAGING AUTOIMMUNE DISEASE – WENDY BLANCHARD, M.S., INHC, NYCPS

On Sept. 9, 2021, due to excessive walking and standing, bending, ongoing, over a period of 8 hours, which is too stressful for me physically, I ended the day in systemic, gross swelling, and systemic pain.

It has been an uphill battle to manage the symptoms, Recently, my hematologist shared that I am anemic, and need a bi-monthly infusion. Even the infusion sent my body into an “alarm” state as it found homeostasis again, adapting to the iron being infused into my veins. I am still weak, but improving.

Yesterday, I could feel my entire body swelling. I felt heavy, and my brain seemed to be struggling to focus. I awoke this morning to a full blown Lupus inflammation, including brain fog, (why did I come into the kitchen?) to blurred vision, and my hands/wrists, knees and feet that are grossly swollen and painful. And, I am experiencing what feels like allergies with chest congestion.

Physical stress and mental stress exacerbate autoimmune. It is a hamster wheel as I live with this chronic illness that really has not let up in 5 months, and it causes chronic stress. Chronic pain causes our mental health to be challenged. And, when our mental health is challenged, it manifests in our body…autoimmune.

“Lupus is a disease that occurs when your body’s immune system attacks your own tissues and organs (autoimmune disease). Inflammation caused by lupus can affect many different body systems — including your joints, skin, kidneys, blood cells, brain, heart and lungs.”

I share this to offer some management techniques that I find soothing and helpful, and if it resonates, feel free to explore what may work for you.

  1. Deep breathing. I breathe into the pain, and use wellness visualization that is calming. This is where I take control of my mind in order to stay in a calm space. And I listen to a calming gong bath (find on Youtube) or music that relaxes me.
  2. Stay hydrated. This morning I have had 48 ounces of lemon water in order to flush out inflammation. Keep drinking throughout.
  3. Allow yourself to cry. Allow yourself to feel the frustration, anger, sadness, or whatever you are feeling. Tears release emotions.
  4. REST is essential.
  5. Light stretching. (NOT WITHOUT A DOCTOR’S PERMISSION) Although the swelling and pain are acute, I CHOOSE to engage in light stretching to keep my muscles and joints moving. I will not allow atrophy to set in. My specialist has approved this activity.
  6. Drink healing liquids such as bone broth. I like to drink healthy liquids rather than eat solid foods during a flare to give my gut time to rest and reset as I heal.
  7. Anti-inflammatory. I take an over the counter anti-inflammatory, and when that does not relieve symptoms, my specialist has prescribed a stronger anti-inflammatory to reduce the inflammation.

NEVER USE ANY OF THESE SUGGESTIONS, OR MAKE ANY CHANGES TO YOUR PHYSICAL/MENTAL HEALTH REGIMEN WITHOUT A MEDICAL DOCTOR’S APPROVAL. THESE ARE ONLY SUGGESTIONS THAT HAPPEN TO WORK FOR ME.

For more information on how to manage autoimmune disease through natural and organic solutions, fill out the contact page here on my website, and I will be in touch within 24 hours. In order to offer the best health coaching for you, I will always ask to be connected to your healthcare professional for your safety.

My best advice is to do what feels right for your own body. Only YOU know what that is. Ask for support, if needed. Practice extra self care and self love, and allow yourself whatever time you need to heal.

Hugs,

Wendy

Self-Care Health Relax - Free photo on Pixabay

Wendy Blanchard, M.S., INHC, NYCPS